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Dell Technologies 3D printing PPE for local first responders

On Friday, Dell started delivering the face shields to the Dell Medical School. The school plans to distribute them to Austin Public Health and first responders.

AUSTIN, Texas — Dell Technologies is stepping up to the plate to make personal protective equipment for first responders.

Engineers at the Round Rock-based company are making 3D-printed visors that medical professionals and first responders can wear to protect themselves from the coronavirus.

“So many of our team members are passionate about giving back to their communities,” a Dell Technologies spokesperson told KVUE. “Some of our Austin team members saw a need for protective gear and used their expertise and innovation to help.”

RELATED: UT-developed 3D-printed masks could be in hospitals by next week

On Friday, Dell started delivering 500 of the face shields to the Dell Medical School. The school plans to distribute the masks to Austin Public Health and first responders in the area.

“We’re seeing many grassroots efforts led by our team members around the world, helping each other during this challenging time,” the spokesperson said.

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Other Central Texas businesses and organizations are also pitching in to help with 3D-printed equipment, including Pflugerville Signs and Essentium Materials and the Cockrell School’s innovation center at UT.

UT researchers have also been developing a prototype for an emergency ventilator. They’re hoping to soon have companies license the ventilator for free once it is FDA-approved, so it can be mass-produced.

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