AUSTIN, Texas — Courtney Carano Smith, ex-wife of former Ohio State Football coach Zach Smith, returned to Twitter on Thursday to promote her new blog.

"I’m writing a blog to combat cont. harassment & document my experience with domestic abuse," Carano Smith tweeted.

The tweet included a link to her blog, Mended Halos, where she introduced herself to readers and told a little of her story.

Smith said, "My blog is a work in progress and one that I hope to develop over time, but initially these are the following topics I will be addressing," followed by a bulleted list:

Courtney Smith's blog topics
Mended Halo

In that list, Smith mentioned her friendship with the Hermans and their "involvement" in her life.

Michelle Herman, wife of Texas Football Head Coach Tom Herman, shared Smith's tweet writing, "The blog is amazing, very well done!"

Herman and others on Twitter also eluded to the audio tapes of Zach Smith –which are included in the blog – calling them "chilling" and "super scary." 

"This blog detailing Courtney Smith’s interactions with Zach Smith is scary and sad," said Anwar Richardson, who writes for OrangeBloods.com and Rivals.com. "The audio tapes are super scary. Really shows what she’s been dealing with."

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Zach Smith, who was fired from Ohio State in July 2018, was accused of suspicion of felony domestic violence in 2015.

Smith accused Tom Herman of cheating on Michelle in the past, tweeting a picture of text messages he sent to the Longhorns' head coach.

Herman replied to the text messages with, "Ok. Cool, Hook Em!," which quickly began trending on social media.

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