AUSTIN, Texas — On Tuesday, voters had their say on 10 state propositions, each a proposed amendment to the Texas Constitution. Voters had the opportunity to vote “for” or “against” each of them.

RELATED: 10 state propositions will be on the ballot this Election Day. Here’s what you need to know

At 11:45p.m. Tuesday, 97% of the state's precincts had reported results. Here is how everything was looking at that point: 

Proposition 1 (HJR 72)

With 97% of precincts reporting, it looked as though Proposition 1 will be rejected by voters. At 11:45 p.m., 65% had voted against and 35% had voted for.

The proposition would have allowed an elected municipal judge to serve as a judge in more than one municipality at the same time. Unlike an appointed municipal judge, an elected municipal judge may not hold multiple municipal judge offices at once.

Proposition 2 (SJR 79)

With 97% of precincts reporting, it looked as though Proposition 2 will pass. At 11:45 p.m., 64% had voted for and 36% had voted against.

The proposition’s passing would authorize the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) to issue additional general obligation bonds – bonds secured by the government that use resources like tax revenues – up to $200 million for the Economically Distressed Areas Program (EDAP).

These bonds can only be used to provide funds for the development of water supply and sewer services projects in those specific economically distressed areas, as defined by law.

Proposition 3 (HJR 34)

With 97% of precincts reporting, it looked as though Proposition 3 will pass. At 11:45 p.m., 85% had voted for and 15% had voted against.

The proposition’s passing would allow the Texas legislature to temporarily exempt from ad valorem taxation – or taxation based on property or transaction value – a portion of certain property located in an area covered by a disaster declaration by Gov. Greg Abbott.

Lawmakers will prescribe the method of determining the amount of exemption and how long that property would be exempted for. The amendment will also allow lawmakers to create any additional requirements for the exemption.

Proposition 4 (HJR 38)

With 97% of precincts reporting, it looked as though Proposition 4 will pass. At 11:45 p.m., 76% had voted for and 24% had voted against.

The proposition’s passing would make it even harder for the State of Texas to impose or collect an individual income tax.

Currently, the Texas Constitution prohibits the legislature from implementing a state income tax unless voters approve it. And if voters did approve it, the current law requires most of the tax revenue be used to fund education. Prop 4 gets rid of that clause and requires a two-thirds vote of the legislature and a vote of the people to implement the tax. Prop 4 also doesn't specify what that money would be used for.

Proposition 5 (SJR 24)

With 97% of precincts reporting, it looked as though Proposition 5 will pass. At 11:45 p.m., 88% had voted for and 12% had voted against.

The proposition’s passing would automatically appropriate the state’s sales tax revenue on sporting goods to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and the Texas Historical Commission. This money currently goes to the state’s General Fund.

Lawmakers will keep the authority to determine how this money is used and how it’s allocated to the two organizations.

Proposition 6 (HRJ 12)

With 97% of precincts reporting, it looked as though Proposition 6 will pass. At 11:45 p.m., 63% had voted for and 37% had voted against.

The proposition’s passing would let lawmakers increase the maximum bond amount for the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) from $3 billion to $6 billion. That money will be issued by the Texas Public Finance Authority.

Proposition 7 (HJR 151)

With 97% of precincts reporting, it looked as though Proposition 7 will pass. At 11:45 p.m., 73% had voted for and 27% had voted against.

The proposition’s passing would allow the State Board of Education, General Land Office and other entities that manage revenue from land and other properties to distribute up to $600 million from the Permanent School Fund annually to schools. Currently, they're allowed to distribute $300 million per year.

Proposition 8 (HJR 4)

With 97% of precincts reporting, it looked as though Proposition 8 will pass. At 11:45 p.m., 77% had voted for and 23% had voted against.

The proposition’s passing would create a special flood infrastructure fund in the State Treasury, using money from the Economic Stabilization Fund or the “rainy day fund.” This special fund will provide additional resources to implement plans to mitigate flood damage, including authorizing the Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) to use the money for drainage, flood mitigation or flood control projects.

Proposition 9 (HJR 95)

With 97% of precincts reporting, it looked as though Proposition 9 may pass, though it is very close. At 11:45 p.m., 52% had voted for and 48% had voted against.

The proposition’s passing would allow lawmakers to create a property tax exemption for precious metals kept in a depository in Texas.

The dictionary defines precious metals as “any of the less common and highly valuable metals (as gold, silver and the platinum metals),” and there actually is a state-run vault where you can store your precious metals, located right here in Central Texas.

Proposition 10 (SJR 32)

With 97% of precincts reporting, it looked as though Proposition 10 will pass. At 11:45 p.m., 94% had voted for and 6% had voted against.

The proposition’s passing would allow law enforcement animals, such as police K9s, to be transferred into the care of their handler or another qualified caretaker in certain circumstances.

Currently, the Texas Constitution doesn’t allow the transfer of certain public property, such as these animals, to a private person or organization for free. This amendment changes that, allowing law enforcement animals to be transferred to their handler or another qualified caretaker for free, upon the animal’s retirement or at another time if the transfer is thought to be in the animal’s best interest.

Stay up to date with all the latest election news by visiting the Vote Texas section of our website at KVUE.com/votetexas.

PEOPLE ARE ALSO READING:

UPDATE: 2-year-old girl, father found, Bexar County Sheriff's Office confirms

Officer Abigail Arias, Freeport’s 7-year-old warrior, dies from cancer

John Legend, Kelly Clarkson remake 'Baby, It's Cold Outside' to focus on consent