AUSTIN — Texas Republicans were victorious in the 2018 Midterm Election, stifling a "blue wave" that many predicted was on its way.

Senator Ted Cruz (R), Governor Greg Abbott and Lt. Governor Dan Patrick have been declared victorious, along with a long list of other Republican politicians. Still, a few notable Democrats claimed seats in other races like the Austin City Council, and Democrat Lloyd Doggett claimed an eighth term as U.S. Representative for District 35. Democrat Steve Adler also claimed a second term as Austin's mayor.

For a different view of standings along with percentages, click here.

BLOG

This blog is no longer being updated as of 8:30 a.m. Nov. 7.

Nov. 7

8:15 a.m.: Three Austin City Council races ended election night with runoff elections. Those include Districts 1, 3 and 8. The runoff election is scheduled for Dec. 11.

12:15 a.m.: Propositions A-I pass while J and K fails

Nov. 6

11:45 p.m.: Sid Miller claims Texas Agriculture Commissioner seat. Jon Carter (R) claims U.S. Representative for District 31 seat.

11:40 p.m.: Ken Paxton (R) claims Texas Attorney General seat.

11:30 p.m.: Michael McCaul (R) claims seat as U.S. Representative for District 10.

11:15 p.m.: George P. Bush (R) claims Texas Land Commissioner seat. John Devine (R) claims Texas Supreme Court Justice Place 4. Jeff Brown (R) claims Texas Supreme Court Justice Place 6. Barbara Parker Hervey (R) claims Texas Court of Criminal Appeals Place 7.

10:55 p.m.: Glenn Hegar (R) claims seat as Texas Comptroller. Christi Craddick (R) claims seat as Texas Railroad Commissioner.

10:45 p.m.: Charles Schwertner (R) claims seat as Texas Senator for District 5.

10:30 p.m.: Michelle Slaughter (R) wins Texas Court of Criminal Appeals Place 8. Donna Campbell (R) claims Texas Senator seat for District 25. John P. Cyrier (R) claims seat for Texas Representative District 17. Terry M. Wilson (R) claims seat for Texas Representative District 20.

10:15 p.m.: Dan Patrick (R) re-elected Texas Lieutenant Governor. Chip Roy claims seat U.S. Representative for District 21.

10:10 p.m.: Roger Williams (R) claims seat for U.S. Representative for District 25.

10:00 p.m.: Steve Adler (D) claims victory as Mayor of Austin.

9:45 p.m.: Kirk Watson (D) claims Texas Senator for District 14.

9:28 p.m.: The Associated Press declares Ted Cruz (R) victorious over Beto O'Rourke (D) in U.S. Senate race.

9:11 p.m.: Gina Hinojosa (D) claims Texas Representative for District 49. Sheryl Cole (D) claims Texas Representative for District 46.

9:10p.m.: ABC News projects Ted Cruz (R) will win Senate race against Beto O'Rourke (D).

9:00 p.m.: Kyle Biedermann (R) claims Texas Representative for District 73. Ben Leman (R) claims Texas Representative for District 13.

8:26 p.m.: Lloyd Doggett (D) claims U.S. Representative for District 35 for an eighth term.

8:19 p.m.: Andrew S. Murr (R) claims Texas Representative for District 53.

8:09 p.m.: Gov. Greg Abbott has earned another four years as governor of Texas. He defeated his Democratic challenger Lupe Vadez election night, and is set to start his second term in January.

7:50 p.m.: Michael Cloud (R) claims U.S. Representative for District 27.

7:30 p.m.: Mike Conaway (R) claims U.S. Representative for District 11. Bill Flores (R) claims U.S. Representative for District 17.

7:00 p.m.: Most polls across Central Texas officially close. Early results begin trickling in.

5:30 p.m.: What happens tonight could have major implications next year. Everything from your taxes to your child's education to national issues like immigration. One of the big things everyone is talking about is the potential shift in the balance of power in Congress. Historically, power shifts during a president's first mid-term election. While that's not likely to happen in the Senate, it very likely will happen in the House.

All 435 members of the House of Representatives are up for re-election. Now, there are 240 republicans and 195 democrats. Democrats need to gain just 23 seats to take control. And political forecasters at Five-Thirty-Eight calculate there's a seven in eight chance of that happening. One seat up for grabs is the only open Congressional seat in our area -- District 21. The Republican who holds that seat now -- Lamar Smith -- isn't seeking re-election.

RELATED: FULL DEBATE: Joseph Kopser and Chip Roy face off in Texas District 21 debate

Of course, we'll also be watching all of the local elections -- including those seven bond propositions Austin residents are weighing in on. They total $925 million.

RELATED: Inside the Austin Propositions on the November ballot

Starting at 7 p.m., we will have live election coverage on KVUE, KVUE.com, KVUE's Facebook page, KVUE Twitter page and KVUE's YouTube channel.

2:40 p.m. - Williamson County officials told KVUE's Rebeca Trejo that as of 2:40 p.m.., they received 24,436 votes on election day 2018 alone compared to the 2016 presidential election when 25,000 people voted on election day by 2 p.m. Officials said this year's number is significant given that this election is a Midterm election and not a presidential election.

11:30 a.m. - The Travis County Clerk told KVUE's Rebeca Trejo that about 25,000 people have voted on Election Day so far. They're expecting 100,000 voters by the end of Election Day.

KVUE reported at the end of early voting that voters in the Austin area were turning out in record-setting numbers.

RELATED: Voters turning out in record-setting numbers in Austin area, across Texas this 2018 election

9:08 a..m. - The Travis County Clerk's office is back up and running. Go here to find your polling location.

8:17 a.m. - The Travis County Clerk's office is reporting their website is having issues. Officials said prospective voters should use this link to find the best election day voting center.

WHAT'S ON MY BALLOT

For several months, KVUE has been working on election coverage to make sure you're prepared for everything that is expected to be on your ballot.

Click here to read up on the propositions on Austin's ballot.

Click here to read up on the Austin City Council race.

Click here to read up on the Texas Governor race.

Click here to read up on the Texas candidates running in the U.S. Senate race.

More information about what you can find on your ballot can be found here.

WHAT TO DO AFTER VOTING?

Pat your self on the back for doing your civic duty and enjoy some of the election day specials you can get for flashing your "I Voted" sticker.

Go here to see who has the best deals!

Also, stay tuned to KVUE's coverage.

We'll have live updates throughout the day on developing election news and results on KVUE.com, Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and TV.