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Groups on both sides of Prop B are making last-minute efforts to rally people to the polls Saturday

Election Day in Travis County is Saturday, May 1.

AUSTIN, Texas — On the eve of the May 1 election, groups on both sides of the controversial Proposition B made last-minute efforts to rally people to the polls. 

Save Austin Now, a coalition that supports Prop B, held a press conference Friday to introduce a new group called Moms For Prop B. During the press conference, moms from across the city told their negative experiences with people experiencing homelessness. 

"I experienced a lot of people exposing themselves and using the restroom in front of my kid while walking from the house at night time," explained one East Austin mom.

"My students don't feel safe even going to class," said one University of Texas mom. "The freshmen girls will walk nowhere without a large group." 

City Council Member Mackenzie Kelly also spoke in support of Prop B. 

On the other side, Homes Not Handcuffs, a group against Prop B, had dozens of people making calls, sending text messages and, soon, knocking on doors in Dove Springs to get people to the polls. 

"We are trying to make sure folks in areas where people haven't shown up as much are aware of the election," said Chris Harris. "On the Eastside, there have been very few early voting locations and, tomorrow, there will be easier opportunities to vote." 

Mayor Steve Adler and a handful of other city council members have opposed Prop B.

This has been a controversial topic, as we have seen more and more homeless camps pop up around the city. Even Ben and Jerry's Ice Cream put its two cents in on the proposition, tweeting that Prop B would take Austin backward. 

If passed, Prop B would make it illegal to camp in certain places, sit or lie on public sidewalks or outdoors in certain areas, and panhandle at night.

The polls open Saturday at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m.

According to the Travis County Clerk's Office, 14% of registered voters voted early.