AUSTIN, Texas — Austinites love talking about how Californians are rushing into the city.

But is it true? Are tons of Californians picking up and moving to the "live music capital of the world" – edging out native Texans?

We took a look at the numbers to Verify. 

The short answer: Not even close.

We consulted the U.S. Census Bureau and the Austin Chamber of Commerce and found the majority of Austin's population growth since 2010 has been due to domestic migration or people moving here from somewhere else in the U.S.

From that number, more than half of the people – 53.2% – who moved to Austin were just from a different part of Texas.

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The California numbers weren't even close to that. From 2012 to 2016, Californians accounted for just a little more than 6% of Austin's new residents.

However, it is true that California is the number one source of people moving to Austin from out of state. Behind California are Florida and New York, with 3.6% and 3% respectively.

So, to say Californians are "invading" Austin is false.

Have something you want us to look into and Verify? Send an email to verify@kvue.com or use #Verify on social media.

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