AUSTIN — On Christmas Eve, hundreds of people across Central Texas scrambled to get last minute bottles of liquor.

That's because Texas prohibits the sale of liquor on Christmas Day. And the same goes for New Year's Day.

"The whole shutting down liquor stores on holidays is kind-of weird and a little strange," Alfredo Quezada Jr. said.

Quezada was out at Spec's liquor store shopping for alcohol on Christmas Eve.

The start of Texas alcohol bans goes back to 1935, when Texas lawmakers passed the Texas Liquor Control Act, right after the national prohibition. The ban on selling liquor on Christmas Day goes back to 1967. Thanksgiving and New Year's were added to the list in 1979.

"There's a few things that could afford to be changed, like closing down liquor stores and the strange alcohol laws on Sunday mornings," Quezada said.

Speaking of that Sunday law, this ban isn't the only law from the Texas Alcohol Beverage Commission (TABC) that's a little weird.

Here is a list with some of the wackiest alcohol laws in Texas:

In Texas, you can drink as a minor.

You heard us right, you can drink as a minor, but only if the minor's parent, legal guardian or adult spouse is present, according to TABC.

No sales near churches or schools.

TABC says you can't sell alcoholic beverages within 300 feet of a public or private school, church or public hospital, and the distance from a school can be increased to 1,000 feet under certain circumstances.

RELATED:

Reminder: Texans can’t buy liquor on Christmas or New Year’s Day

Round Rock businesses will soon be able to serve alcohol until 2 a.m. -- but not everyone is happy

More craft breweries in Austin than any other city in Texas

No sale during certain hours and days.

This is when things get really wacky. There are certain times you can purchase alcohol depending on the type of establishment. Below is a list of the times and days by TABC:

ON-PREMISE LICENSE OR PERMIT (E.G. BAR OR RESTAURANT)

  • Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-midnight
  • Saturday: 7 a.m.-1 a.m. (Sunday morning)
  • Sunday: Noon to midnight. (10 a.m.-noon only in conjunction with the service of food)
  • If the establishment is in a city or county legal for late hours, and they have a late hours permit, they can sell alcohol for on-premise consumption until 2 a.m. any night of the week.

OFF-PREMISE BEER/WINE LICENSE OR PERMIT (E.G. CONVENIENCE STORE OR GROCERY STORE)

  • Monday-Friday: 7 a.m.-midnight
  • Saturday: 7 a.m.-1 a.m. (Sunday morning)
  • Sunday: noon to midnight
  • A wine-only package store that holds a beer license may not sell wine containing more than 17 percent alcohol by volume on a Sunday or after 10 p.m. on any day.
  • A wine-only package store that does NOT hold a beer license must have the same hours of sale as a package store.

PACKAGE STORE / LIQUOR STORE

  • Monday-Saturday: 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
  • Closed on Sunday, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, New Year's Day.
  • If Christmas Day or New Year's Day falls on a Sunday, closed the following Monday. (That's right, liquor stores have to be closed on a day that isn't even a holiday if Christmas Day or New Year's Day fall on a Sunday.)

SPORTS VENUE

“Sports venue” means a public entertainment facility property, as defined by Section 108.73, that is primarily designed and used for live sporting events. In addition to any other period during which the sale of alcohol is authorized, a licensed or permitted premises located in a sports venue may sell alcoholic beverages between 10 a.m. and noon on Sunday.

FESTIVAL, FAIR OR CONCERT

In addition to any other period during which the sale of alcohol is authorized, a licensed or permitted premises located at a festival, fair or concert may sell alcoholic beverages between 10 a.m. and noon on Sunday.

WINERY

  • Monday-Saturday: 8 a.m.-midnight
  • Sunday: 10 a.m. to midnight

Yes, the times and days are weird, but hold on, because the wacky train continues.

To-go margaritas and daiquiris are legal.

Yes, to-go margaritas and daiquiris are legal just like they do down in New Orleans ... kinda.

The daiquiris that are to-go in Texas are different. TABC states a wine and beer retailer's permit has to be obtained by the business to sell to-go margaritas and daiquiris, but even then, these drinks can only be made with wine or beer. So, the drink may taste a little different and it definitely won't have any rum or tequila in it.

For a list of questions and answers regarding what is legal and what isn't, be sure to check out the TABC website here. Always remember, drink responsibly.