MANOR, Texas -- Kids helping kids, that's what's happening at an elementary school in Manor.

The program called SOS, or Serving our School, consists of second- through fifth-graders at Blake Manor Elementary School.

"So first I grab the bag,” said fourth-grader Janessa Jeansonne.

The group goes through an assembly line, filling backpacks with food for fellow classmates.

"We pack bags to give to kids here that don't have enough money to buy food on the weekends,” said Jeansonne.

"And on Fridays we deliver it to the kids,” said third-grader Joseph Staes.

Each week they plan out a menu with a variety of foods.

"Milk, apple sauce,” said third-grader Brian Samaniego.

"There's a main dish, which today we had spaghetti,” said third-grader Jose Rivera.

"If the kids have allergies to some of our foods, we find a replacement,” said third-grader Cash Simpson.

"We want the kids to be able to feed themselves,” said Counselor Janet Ward.

Ward said 56 kids at the school get the bags filled with items to make breakfast, lunch and dinner over the weekend.

"We saw this gap, and it was like, can we find a way to help these babies so that when they come back Monday they're ready to learn,” said Ward.

"On the weekends they won't be in school so, so they will starve at home,” said Simpson.

She said the students have already packed more than 10,000 food items this year.

"They count everything, they double count everything,” said Ward.

According to her, it helps fill the food gap for students in need.

"The kids that really need it, you know, because they meet me Monday morning with that backpack to turn it in in the cafeteria, and sometimes they start asking me on Wednesday, 'Are you going to give me my bag this week,'” said Ward.

Each of the students are happy to serve up a helping hand.

"I enjoy helping other people,” said fifth-grader Salama Daudi.

"I love packing the bags and giving it to the kids,” said second-grader Lia Moreno.

"It kind of makes me feel proud of myself,” said Staes.

"It just makes me feel proud about myself, and it makes me feel like I'm actually doing something good for people,” said Rivera.

While Ward is glad the students can help each other, she said the lessons these students learn is why she runs the program.

"To me the most important part is growing those kids too, because when they leave, I can pack 10 bags, if they don't get it done,” said Ward. "I think a lot of people discount what kiddos can pull off, but they do that out of the goodness of their heart."

"I see the way it's instilling in him a sense of giving back to the community,” added Misty Simpson, Cash’s Simpson’s mother.

This is the only school in the district doing the program right now, and they need food donations. If you want to help, you can find their Amazon wish list here.