MANOR, Texas — We're seeing more and more from you, as so many are trying to help whoever they can as we deal with this pandemic.

"So the project here is called Manor, Texas, COVID-19 disaster relief," said Monique Celedon, who's helping organize everything out of the Lions Club in Manor.

It's neighbors helping neighbors.

"So far we've delivered to about 50 elderly residents in the city of Manor," said Celedon.

"Right now we're serving the elderly over 60, the disabled, that are physically disabled, and also single moms have been reaching out to us for formula and diapers and such," Celedon added.

They then take the supplies to the elderly, people like Pamela Fowler's dad.

"They're very grateful," said Fowler. "When we dropped it off over to them yesterday, they were very, very grateful." 

Fowler's one of the volunteers who organize the supplies and makes sure they get to people who need them.

It's a community of people who are all coming to help those who need it the most.

"Right, absolutely, so the most important thing when you live in a small community like this is making the connections life long," said Celedon.

Connections like the one between Celedon and Lions Club president Anne Weir is how they got the use of the building.

"Manor has been this way ever since I've moved to this community and this is just something that we do whenever anybody knows a need we're so close that the word just spreads like wildfire and we jump in like wildfire," said Weir.

So as they continue to pack up the supplies, they know at the end of the day it's neighbors helping neighbors.

"People just jump in and start helping, and I just appreciate that so much," said Celedon.

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