AUSTIN, Texas — "April showers bring May flowers," but you can't get those Texas wildflowers without planting them.

And if you live in Central Texas, now is the time to start planting those wildflowers so you can enjoy them come spring.

Central Texas wildflower seeds should be planted between now and Dec. 1 if you want to surround yourself in a field of bluebonnets, Indian paintbrushes and firewheels, according to this plant hardiness zone map from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has published a web page to help gardeners plant wildflowers

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The Soil Conservation Service recommends planting 20 seeds per square foot, according to TxDOT. Be sure to investigate how much sunlight, how much drainage and what type of soil and fertilizer is needed for the seeds before you plant them.

VIDEO: How to plant bluebonnets at home

Gardeners do not need to prepare the soil, but they do need to ensure that there is good "soil-seed contact" by dragging something along the area after sowing seeds, TxDOT said. After that, gardeners are urged to water the area thoroughly. Then, the area should be watered every three days for about three weeks.

KVUE spoke with an expert to find out how to plant bluebonnets at home.

Next spring, you'll start to see bluebonnets pop up along Texas highways. That's because TxDOT plants the seeds along the roads. Texas was one of the first states to start a program like this.

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