AUSTIN, Texas — Beautiful monarch butterflies are expected to make their annual migration through Central Texas over the next couple of weeks.

This year is expected to be one of the largest migrations in recent years.

With so many butterflies passing through there are some ways you can attract more to your yard depending on what you plant.

According to the National Wildlife Federation, you can plant milkweed and other nectar-rich flowers in your yard to attract more of the butterflies.

Putting these plants in your yard will also attract bees, moths and hummingbirds, the federation said.

RELATED:

Huge numbers of monarch butterflies expected in Austin for annual migration

Millions of monarch butterflies killed by storms in Mexico

Bees, butterflies to get better habitat along Interstate 35

Craig Wilson, director for the USDA Future Scientists Program and senior research associate in the Center for Mathematics and Science Education at Texas A&M and a butterfly enthusiast, said in an article by Texas A&M Today milkweed is an essential plant that monarchs rely on for food and it is plentiful in Central Texas.

“Texas is a crucial place for them – they have to pass through the state on their way north in the spring and lay eggs,” Wilson said in the article.

You can track the monarch butterflies' migration through maps posted on Journey North's website, here.

According to Kelly Simon with Texas Parks and Wildlife, it is important to plant native plants, as they will typically have higher quality and volumes of nectar.

Flowers
Asclepias asperula Green antelope horns (Credit: Stephanie Brundage Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)
Stephanie Brundage Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Butterflyweed
Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly milkweed (Credit: Bruce Leander Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)
Bruce Leander Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Flowers
Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly milkweed (Credit: Alan Cressler Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)
Alan Cressler Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Flowers
Lantana urticoides Texas Lantana (Credit: Alan Cressler Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)
Alan Cressler Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
Flowers
Asclepias incarnata Pink milkweed (Credit: Alan Cressler Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center)
Alan Cressler Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

Simon said it is also important to be mindful of the pesticides you are using as it could harm the butterflies.

PEOPLE ARE ALSO READING:

Grandmother's prayer closet only thing left standing after tornado demolishes Alabama home

'I got a big wakeup call': Holocaust survivor tells gripping story at Austin synagogue

Huge numbers of monarch butterflies expected in Austin for annual migration

After alleged attack on gay couple, Austin man forms 'Rainbow Patrol' to provide a sense of safety to LGBT community