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How to make, wear a face mask to help slow spread of coronavirus

The CDC has released new guidelines on how to cover your face with a homemade mask in public settings.

BUFFALO, N.Y. — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is recommending that people should cover their faces when in public spaces where social distancing may be difficult, such as when shopping for essentials.

This is emphasized for hot-spot areas. 

You may have seen videos circulating on social media of how to construct face masks from common objects, such as bandannas and hair ties, and posts by people selling homemade masks. 

The CDC is now providing tutorial instructions on how to properly make masks yourself, either using a sowing machine with basic materials; a tee shirt and a pair of scissors, or with a bandanna, coffee filter and hair ties. 

The CDC recommendations also provides the following advice for those wearing a face covering or face mask: 

  • Do not put face masks or coverings on children under 2 years old and people who cannot remove the face mask themselves (such as people who are unconscious/incapacitated).
  • Don't wear a mask if you are having trouble breathing. Your breathing shouldn't be restricted by the mask.
  • Wash your face mask regularly in a washing machine. You should be able to wash your mask and machine dry it without damaging or changing its shape.
  • Masks should be snug-fitting to the sides of your face, be secured using ties or ear loops, and include multiple layers of fabric.
  • Cloth masks are meant for use by the general public, and supplies such as surgical masks and N-95 respirators should be reserved for heath care workers and first responders. 

For more information about the coronavirus pandemic, face coverings, how to protect yourself and cleaning your home, you can click here.

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