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Will you get a fine for having a wedding in Austin-Travis County?

Some are wondering how new rules affect weddings in the city.

AUSTIN, Texas — After Austin's health authority put new rules in place to stop the spread of the coronavirus, some are wondering how that impacts weddings in Austin and Travis County.

Dr. Mark Escott on Tuesday adopted rules that align with Austin City Council's actions, creating an offense and penalty for those who violate health and safety mandates made to stop the spread of the coronavirus. Those rules are in place until Nov. 12. If you're caught breaking the rules, you could face a fine of up to $2,000.

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No gatherings larger than 10 people are allowed in the city limits.

But the question on some Austinites' minds is how those new rules affect their upcoming weddings.

Businesses that are hosting an indoor wedding or wedding reception are not subject to the 10-person outdoor limit but must limit the capacity to 50%. Outdoor venues are not restricted to an occupancy limit, but they must comply with the Texas Department of State Health Services protocols, including face coverings and social distancing.

If a wedding is happening in a restaurant, the organizers must follow the restaurant rules for COVID-19. 

However, if a wedding is a religious service, there is no indoor or outdoor occupancy limit.

Rules for other businesses and events can be found on the City of Austin website.

WATCH: Love in a time of coronavirus: Central Texas couple holds drive-in wedding

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