KINGSLAND, Texas — Cheri Finkelstein still remembers how quickly the water washed into her home in October 2018.

“In 15 minutes, we had 10 feet of water up the stairs,” she said.

Finkelstein said the community met up and started working out a plan to get cleaned up.

“Everybody started buying shovels, wheelbarrows and people coming by from the area in Kingsland and we just started mucking out,” she said.

She said the community is still getting rid of the mud. 

“Slowly but surely, it’s getting close.”

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The community members who live on the cove decided to pool their money and get creative.

“It’s definitely a little bit out of the ordinary,” Justin Gregg, owner of New Wave Resources, said.

Through some brainstorming, they decided a cofferdam was the solution to the lake water rising before they finished the cleanup.

“[It's] essentially a big water bag that we’re filling up in order to keep back the water from the lake,” Gregg said.

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While they worked to pump the water out of the cove, Gregg recalled finding trees, parts of boats and cars and “obviously sand” inside the cove.

“We were hoping to get it done before the lake came back up, but we weren’t able to, so this is our solution, kind-of innovation,” Gregg said. “Just using the resources that we could find to make sure the job gets done.”

The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) said the contractor reached out to them prior to the project, and they approved the work.

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