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Boomtown 2040: Austin sees the nation's 5th largest population increase over the past decade

The data also showed Austin is now the 11th most populous city in the United States, up from 14th since April 1, 2010.

AUSTIN, Texas — New data from the U.S. Census Bureau shows Austin is fifth in the nation for population increase in the past decade, with an increase of 177,079 people between April 1, 2010, and July 1, 2019.

The data also showed Austin is now the 11th most populous city in the U.S., up from 14th since April 1, 2010.

There’s also been explosive growth in the Central Texas region outside of Austin, when looking at the rate of growth. For cities with more than 50,000 people, New Braunfels is third in the U.S. for fastest-growing, with 90,209 (+56.4%) new people from April 1, 2010, to July 1, 2019.

Cedar Park also made the top 10 fastest-growing list, with 79,462 (+44.2%) new people in the same time period.

And Round Rock is the U.S.’s 13th fastest-growing large city, with 133,372 (+33.3%) new people over the time period.

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As the region grows, it’s predicted between 3.6 million and 3.9 million people will live in the five-county metro area we call Central Texas by 2040. Housing is expected to become more expensive and more compact as the population continues to grow – and with more people comes even more traffic.

The Austin-Bergstrom International Airport is expected to double in size by 2040, with more people flying in and out of the city.

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