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Williamson County EMS, St. David's Round Rock hosting car seat safety event

Car seats will be inspected for expiration, integrity, recalls and their appropriateness for the children using them, as well as if they are installed correctly.

WILLIAMSON COUNTY, Texas — One of the most important jobs parents have is keeping their children safe riding in the car. That's why Williamson County EMS and St. David's Round Rock Medical Center are partnering to host a car seat safety event next week.

Williamson County EMS' Child Safety Seat and Booster Inspection Team conducts regular events at the EMS training building. The agency has a team of certified Child Passenger Safety Technicians and three instructors, and it partners with Austin-Travis County EMS, St. David's Round Rock, the Capital Area Trauma Regional Advisory Council (CATRAC), the Williamson County and Cities Health District (WCCHD) and others to host the events.

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During the events, car seats are inspected for expiration, integrity, recalls and their appropriateness for the children using them. The team also makes sure that seats are installed correctly and that parents or guardians can duplicate the correct installation easily.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that nearly half of all car seats are improperly installed.

Williamson County EMS' next batch of child safety events will be held on Thursday, Feb. 3. There will be four opportunities for parents or guardians to attend: 9:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.

For more information, call 512-943-1264 or email ems-public.education@wilco.org.

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