TECH TUESDAY: Rocksauce

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by TYLER SIESWERDA / KVUE News Photojournalist DATHAN HULL and Editor ROB DIAZ

kvue.com

Posted on July 2, 2013 at 10:02 PM

Updated Tuesday, Jul 2 at 10:33 PM

Four years ago this month a new word was added to our lexicon, App.  Since then billions have been downloaded which has created an industry one Austin company is cashing in on.
 
The numbers are pretty incredible; Apple's iTunes store sold it's 50 billionth app in May and Google Play was just shy of that with 48 billion. Creating the applications that help make us more productive and also consume our down time has become a nearly 10 billion dollar business.

Rocksauce Studios is taking a part of that pie. Rocksauce co-founder and CEO Q Manning says the crazy company name stands for awesome. His company makes apps for the iPhone, iPad, and Android tablets."  Manning was a filmmaker who saw a new industry unfolding where he could merge his film talent with digital.
 
"It's sort of the new gold rush. Web was the same way you know at the end of the '90's but mobile I don't think it's going away because as each day passes more and more devices incorporate small little pieces of programming into them so apps are here to stay," said Manning.
 
Rocksauce is a 17 person app building team. You have the idea, they make it reality.
 
"Sometimes a person will get an idea for an app and they will build their own company.  What Rocksauce does is say hey you don't need to do that.  You can come to us and we will basically be your creative team," said Manning.
 
Rocksauce is behind apps like Digital Fridge, a social sharing app, Active Heroes, which helps support our troops, and BrewskiMe, an app to keep track of and share your favorite beers.

Manning says Rocksauce has also done work for Disney, Polaris, and Alcon.
 
Building an app can cost from several thousand dollars to hundreds of thousands of dollars.
 
Manning see's the mobile app business as an industry that's just getting going, "I think app development is going to continue to become more and more integrated into what we do on a day to day basis.  And I think that's where apps actually succeed."

 

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