Earl Campbell and son Tyler help fight Multiple Sclerosis

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by KVUE Sports

kvue.com

Posted on August 30, 2011 at 12:42 PM

Updated Friday, Oct 18 at 11:20 PM

Heisman Trophy winner and NFL Hall of Fame member Earl Campbell, unveils The Unstoppable Earl Campbell tribute limited edition art from Warner Bros.

The limited edition autographed The Unstoppable Earl Campbell will feature Campbell from his days as a University of Texas Longhorn alongside famous Warner Bros. Looney Tunes characters. The Unstoppable Earl Campbell combines the talent of ten Warner Bros. artists and designers using the traditional hand-drawn and hand-painted process of animation, making this art truly exceptional. Through Pro Player Foundation (www.proplayerfoundation.org), Campbell has chosen to partner with the National MS Society and have a portion of the proceeds from the limited edition piece benefit the organization in honor of his son Tyler’s diagnosis with multiple sclerosis in 2007.

Earl, the most revered and feared running back of his time, is featured in these numbered limited editions available as both a fine art lithograph and a hand-painted cel. He is a part of American animation art history, joining an elite group of sports legends including Michael Jordan, Muhammad Ali, Wayne Gretzky, Derek Jeter, Tim Wakefield and Drew Brees, who have all been featured in a Warner Bros. sports limited edition. Additional information on the limited edition tribute art can be found at www.TheUnstoppableEarlCampbell.org, and images for media use may be accessed at www.broadmanfinearts.com/theunstoppableearlcampbell.

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 400,000 people in the U.S. and over 2.1 million worldwide.
 

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