Foundations to fund $450K Seaholm programming & implementation study

A historic downtown Austin building is getting a little facelift. The city's parks and trail foundation is funding a $450,000 study for the future redevelopment of the Seaholm Waterfront.

AUSTIN - The Austin Parks Foundation (APF), The Trail Foundation (TTF) and City of Austin Parks and Recreation Department (PARD) announced on Monday the funding of a study for the future of Seaholm Waterfront, the Seaholm intake building and surrounding parkland.

The planning phase will begin later in May and be completed in the fall. The city the study will provide them and PARD “with the programming, operational, and economic input needed to develop a world class public facility that will respect the historic significance of the Seaholm Intake structure.”

The plan will rely heavily on public input via online platforms, stakeholder meetings and public open houses. The input will serve as a roadmap for future park improvements and development on the structures and park.

“After years of extensive research, in 2016 PARD took our information and engaged long-time partners Austin Parks Foundation (APF) and the Trail Foundation (TTF) in discussions about the next steps to position the Seaholm Intake Building and surrounding 3-acre parkland for redevelopment as a public and recreational facility,” said PARD Acting Director Kimberly McNeeley. “We are thrilled that they have agreed to fully fund the next planning phase.”

“The Seaholm Intake structure and its accompanying parkland provide a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for redevelopment and adaptive reuse,” says APF CEO Colin Wallis. “With our partners at The Trail Foundation and PARD, we have invested significant time to find the most capable firm to lead the study and feel confident in our selection of Studio Gang.”

Studio Gang, which has developed urbanism projects in the past, will collaborate with Austin sub-consultants on the study.

The Seaholm Intake building was originally constructed in conjunction with the Seaholm Power Plant in the 1950s. It was decommissioned and dedicated as parkland when the power plant was no longer needed to power the city.

TAP HERE for more information on the Seaholm Waterfront project.

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