Lake Travis still rocky bottom reminder of drought

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by HEATHER KOVAR / KVUE News

Bio | Email | Follow: @HeatherK_KVUE

kvue.com

Posted on May 1, 2013 at 8:22 PM

Updated Wednesday, May 29 at 2:53 PM

LAKE TRAVIS -- A look across Lake Travis on this first day of May is a rocky bottom reminder we've been in this drought since September 2010.

The Lower Colorado River Authority released aerials it shot on April 12th following some early April rain. The area picked up more than three inches of rain last month, making it the wettest April since 2008.

According to the Lower Colorado River Authority, Lake Travis rose more than a foot from that rain. But it wasn't enough to put a dent in the drought. Lake Travis remains about 39 feet below it's average for this time of year.

"Lake levels are not good. It's a very serious drought," said David Walker, manager of River Operations at LCRA.

Walker urges everyone to conserve and use water wisely.

"Nature created this drought and nature is going to end it. We don't know when, but it will end it," he said.

All public boat docks and ramps are currently closed at Lake Travis and Buchanan. So additional traffic is heading to Lake Austin.

Pete Tost captains excursions on Lake Austin with Lone Star Aquatics. He says he loves Lake Travis and knows the levels will return. But he says others are throwing in the towel.

"If you look on Craigslist now, a lot of people are just giving up and they're selling their boats, selling their boat slips, they're just selling everything cause they don't think it will ever come back," said Tost.

Walker says we may be in the one of the most severe droughts in history, but that we will recover.

"If you look at the history of the Highland Lakes, it's long history of ups and downs with floods and droughts. It's a cycle we've seen many times. Yes the lakes will come back," he said.

The forecast says this drought pattern will probably continue. Though with rain from time to time, and maybe even some storms from an expected very active upcoming hurricane season.

Here's an aerial look of the drought's effects on Lake Travis:

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