Study: people with shorter names get paid more

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by Jane King / Bloomberg

Bloomberg

Posted on May 7, 2013 at 7:33 AM

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If you're trying to think of a name for your child, you might want to keep it short. A new study by The Ladders says people with short first names usually get paid more, and every letter lengthening a name results in a $3,600 drop in annual pay. If you've already given your child a long name, it's not too late. Every letter you chop off by using a nickname, also results in higher pay. 

 

 

 

 

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