Accused drug maker says he found explosive directions online

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by HEATHER KOVAR / KVUE News

Bio | Email | Follow: @HeatherK_KVUE

kvue.com

Posted on December 4, 2013 at 7:50 PM

Updated Wednesday, Dec 4 at 8:00 PM

AUSTIN -- A man police say caused an apartment complex explosion back in March faces multiple charges. He's accused of making hashish oil using butane, and he claims he learned how to do it online.

On March 27, 2013, the door and windows were blown out of an apartment at the Waters at Bluff Springs complex in South Austin.

In an affidavit police say Ryan Connell admitted to making the oil using a pipe and butane. He told them he had learned the process on YouTube University.

Internet experts say unfortunately you can find just about anything online.

Kyle Cox is the director of IT and wireless at Austin Technology Incubator, which helps high tech companies get launched in Central Texas. He says the Internet has been key to helping businesses, but that there is a seedy underbelly to the World Wide Web.

"The ability of searching the Internet has allowed companies to learn things that they otherwise wouldn't have been able to on their own," said Cox.

Chris Humpreys of the Anfield Group in Austin says even if something is legally removed, the information is probably already on hundreds of other sites. He adds that social media, such as re-tweets from Twitter, can make the matter worse. 

In June a University of Texas student developed a plastic gun that could be built using a 3D printer. He was forced by the U.S. State Department to remove the gun making instructions from his website. There is no telling how many times the instructions were printed prior.

Cox says cutting edge research is going on at the University of Texas on what the next generation of "search" looks like.

"To a point of knowing the context of the user, and who that user may be, search engines are getting smarter and may be filtering out results based on the searcher," said Cox.

He says adding extra layers of intelligence could potentially help fight the issues of everything being available online. 

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