Bees removed from stung man's property

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by HEATHER KOVAR / KVUE News

Bio | Email | Follow: @HeatherK_KVUE

kvue.com

Posted on July 1, 2013 at 5:47 PM

Updated Thursday, Jan 2 at 4:06 PM

JONESTOWN, TX--- Bee attacks in Texas have made the news in the last few weeks. Last month Africanized bees killed a man in Waco. Honey bees put a Central Texas man in the hospital for five days. Despite his injuries, he called on a rescue organization to relocate them instead of harming them.

They were removed Monday by Central Texas Bee Rescue and will be placed on land where they can continue to make honey and pollinate without threat to the homeowner. 

A month ago, Peter Gull was driving his tractor, clearing some land by his home. He hit a wooden box, which turned out to be full of honey bees. He said they formed a black cloud as they stung him. He ran to his pool and jumped in to get them off. He was in the hospital for five days. He says they removed 300 stingers and believe about 300 remain in him, some broken or in hair follicles.

Gillian Hodler with Central Texas Bee Rescue says the noise of the equipment and the jolt was enough to make the bees mad. 

"What they're doing is trying to prevent the queen from being harmed. And so some of them can get quite aggressive," Hodler explains.

She came out to relocate these bees. Her team first used  smoke. It masks bees' ability to communicate. Plus if they think there is a fire, they'll go inside the hive, gorge on honey and become more docile. Hodler says bee removal is quite common.

"We've been getting multiple calls every single day," she says. "When you kill the bees, you are actually killing an important part of the ecosystem. They have an important role as pollinators, and humans actually rely on the pollinators for a large percentage of the food that we eat."

Hodler advises not to swat at a bee. Instead don't act scared and remain calm.

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