Texas winery talks about potential global wine shortage

Texas winery talks about potential global wine shortage

Texas winery talks about potential global wine shortage

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by Phil Anaya / KENS 5

kvue.com

Posted on November 9, 2013 at 5:19 PM

SAN ANTONIO -- A global wine shortage is a real threat because production isn't keeping up with growing demand, according to industry reports.

And consumers aren't the only ones who could be affected. San Antonio wineries also could be facing a grape shortage.

At the Stray Grape Urban Winery off Highway 281, you won’t find a vineyard, but that doesn’t stop the business from making plenty of vino. A customer can even bottle some of the wine and design a custom label to create their own special bottle.

“We term this a 'Build-A-Bear for adults' experience,” Stray Grape manager Dennis Jacks said.

Jacks said business is good and that’s because wine consumption is up. He said the problem for the wine industry is that production is also growing, but not at the same pace as demand.

“They’re starting to project if those trends continue along the same path there will eventually be a shortage in the next four years of enough grapes to produce the wine that’s needed,” Jacks said.

And that could lead to higher wine prices.

When asked what he thought about the potential for a global wine shortage, Stray Grape customer Juaquin Rodriguez laughed and said, “I get high anxiety.”

All joking aside, for a local business that doesn’t grow its own grapes, a global shortage could be a sobering problem.

“For us, since we don’t have our own acreage at this point, we have to have a supply, and it’s even more critical for us,” Jacks said. “So it’s probably a bigger concern for us than it is for others.”

Some people might dispute claims of a potential global wine shortage. Jacks said ultimately no one can predict future supply and demand, and only time will tell.

Jacks also said that in the long run, the high demand is a good problem, especially for local wineries that produce their own grapes.

 

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