When most of Austin was closed, delayed or at least running slowly Tuesday, KVUE's weather team was doing the opposite.

Meteorologists Erika Lopez, Nathan Gogo and Chief Meteorlogist Albert Ramon were working around the clock to make sure Austinites had information to stay safe and warm in the storm.

And behind the scenes of every broadcast, social media post and update was a lot of involved technology.

"You're always gathering information," Meteorologist Nathan Gogo said. "You're always giving information as a meteorologist and updating as the data comes in."

That data comes anywhere from six to 12 different sources or "models," that the team then take and adjust for local variations.

Their broadcasts actually start with complex sensors placed around the city and state. In Austin, KVUE uses sensors at ABIA and Camp Mabry.

"We have to break down what we actually think is going to happen and relay that to the community," Gogo said.

According to him, the different models often vary. It's their job to take the data presented and use current real-time data in Austin to determine what the forecast will be. That means their models are a prediction of Austin's "hour-by-hour" future weather.

Gogo said their job is certainly more advanced with modern technology, but also more widespread. The involvement in social media and other tools allows their reach to go much further.

"Our job has always been to communicate with the public, but now there are just so many avenues to do so," Gogo said. "We do a lot of Facebook Lives -- those are great resources we can hook up through our program so they can see the graphics and we can basically do what we do on TV in a more personalized format."