Parts of Hawaii woke up Saturday to an emergency alert: "BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL."

It wasn't a drill, but there was no incoming missile either. According to Hawaiian officials, the alert was actually sent in error, an error that caused people to abandon cars and fleeing their homes.

So what was it like to wake up on a Saturday morning to that terrifying update?

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KVUE spoke to Sara Silverburg, a Pflugerville woman who just moved to Hawaii for her husband's military job. She said the woke up in disbelief.

"Part of me was like, 'there's no way that it's actually happening,' so I was confused about that but I was scared because it said not a drill and I had never been through anything like that before," said Silverburg.

Sara then told us their next thought: "What now?"

"We kind of just sat there and waited, because we didn't know where to go anyways," she said. "We didn't have a plan or know what to do at all. So we just kind of sat there."

The Hawaii Emergency Management Agency tweeted that there was no threat about 10 minutes after the initial alert, but that didn't stop everyone from falsely over reacting.

A revised alert informing people of the false alarm didn't reach cell phones until about 38 minutes later, according to time stamps on the images Hawaiians shared on social media.